Covering the Bases: Game 24

426McAllisterFinal: Giants 5, Indians 3

FIRST: Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis put it best on Saturday, when asked about what Zach McAllister has meant to the Tribe this month:

“He’s been our best starter so far. Probably the last three starts for him, he’s been kind of our go-to guy when we need a big win.”

Indeed, McAllister — and, in fairness, Corey Kluber fits this description right now, too — has been a steady part of Cleveland’s inconsistent rotation. Even in the wake of Saturday’s loss to the Giants, McAllister has a 2.55 ERA and 0.97 WHIP in 24.2 innings in his last four starts. In that span, he has 19 strikeouts, four walks and a .217 opponents’ average.

Against San Francisco, McAllister was strong out of the gates, holding the Giants to a first-inning, leadoff double over the first four innings. During that stretch, the big right-hander retired a dozen straight batters, relying heavily on his fastball, per usual.

“Early on his fastball had so much life to it and he was commanding it,” Indians manager Terry Franona said. “He just didn’t command it as well in the fifth.”

Therein lies the rub.

In the fifth inning, everything fell apart for the Indians, who could not recover and went on to drop their second game in a row by the bay. When the smoke cleared, McAllister was charged with four runs on five hits in five innings, ending with six strikeouts and one walk. The righty logged just 75 pitches, but his spot was due up second in the sixth, so he was pulled for a pinch hitter. Welcome to National League baseball.

So, what happened?

“I maybe got a few balls up,” McAllister said. “They were able to string together a lot of singles, put the ball in play and make some things happen.”

Francona cites McAllister’s fastball command as an issue and the results certainly back that up. In the first four innings, the Giants went just 1-for-11 against the right-hander’s heater. In the fifth, San Francisco had more success, going 3-for-5 in at-bats that ended with a fastball. Two more plate appearances ending with a fastball in the fifth resulted in a walk and a run-scoring sacrifice fly.

SECOND: This one does not fall solely on McAllister’s shoulders, though. There was a moment when it appeared he’d escape with only two (not four) runs allowed in the fifth. He would’ve still had a 3-2 lead and perhaps Francona would have let him hit in the sixth in order to stay in the game. Hey, McAllister did have a single in the second inning.

The moment in question was when Hunter Pence — with two outs and runners on second and third base — sent a 2-1 fastball across the infield grass and to Kipnis’ left for a would-be groundout. Initially, it looked like a dive would be in order, but the second baseman ran down the ball, closing in quickly enough to feel he had a shot at reaching down to snare it with his glove.

“I was planning on diving the whole time until I kind of gained ground on it,” Kipnis said. “I caught up to it and thought I could reach it. It kind of caught me in-between steps and it’s one of those ones where you just don’t know if you can bend down, slide or dive. I went for the reach and it scooted under my glove.”

It rolled into right field for a two-run single that put the Indians behind for good, 4-3. Buster Posey later launched a solo homer off reliever C.C. Lee for some insurance, but the damage had been done.

No one felt worse about it than Kipnis and, give him credit, he owned up to the mistake in the immediate aftermath of a loss. Plenty of players over the years have declined comment in the moments right after a tough loss in which they played an unfortunate part. Kipnis turned, saw reporters and faced the music.

“It sucks,” Kipnis said. “It cost us pretty much the game and it cost McAllister a good start. I could’ve bailed him out of that inning. It just didn’t happen. I don’t think he cares to hear that. I don’t think he needs to hear that. No one really needs to hear anything. It’s just a play that needs to be made.”

THIRD: Kipnis should also be given credit, along with leadoff man Michael Bourn and No. 2-hitter Nick Swisher, for carrying the early offensive load for the Indians. The first three hitters in the order have been producing more of late, which is a great sign for the Tribe.

In Saturday’s loss, that trio went a combined 5-for-15 with three extra-base hits, three RBIs and three runs scored. The rest of the lineup went a combined 4-for-20.

Over his last five games, Bourn has hit at a .370 (10-for-27) clip with one double, two triples, three RBIs, three runs, one walk and a stolen base. Swisher, over his last five games, has hit .360 (9-for-25) with five doubles, two RBIs, two walks and three runs scores. Swisher’s hot stretch actually covers his last eight games, during which he’s sported a .323 average for the Indians.

Over his last nine games, Kipnis has hit .314 (11-for-35) with a homer, three doubles, five RBIs, three walks and four runs scored.

HOME: Cleveland did a great job of getting to Giants starter Tim Lincecum, chasing the right-hander from the game after 98 pitches and 4.2 innings. Unfortunately for the Indians, they then went 0-for-13 against San Francisco’s bullpen and ended the afternoon 1-for-9 with runners in scoring position (after a 1-for-9 showing with RISP on Friday night).

“We did a really good job of making Lincecum work,” Francona said. “We just weren’t able to get that one more hit to tack on and spread it out a little bit.”

On deck:

Indians (11-13) at Giants (14-10)
at 4:05 p.m. ET at AT&T Park

–JB

3 Comments

Was Kipnis shifted too much toward 2B on the Pence ball? Pence is not that much of a pull hitter. The Giants announcers commented several times on the extreme amount of shifting the Indians do (“the champions of Cactus League shifting”)

Scouting reports show Pence has a tendency to slap the ball up the middle in those situations, don,t forget Kipnis is no Robby Alomar

The Indians did OK against Lincecum but he brought his ERA down today by holding the Indians to 3 runs.

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