Game changer: Indians react to new collision rules

SantanaHP2Indians fans remember the play. The single to right field. The throw to the plate. Boston’s Ryan Kalish plowing into the left leg of catcher Carlos Santana, who toppled over, losing a shoe and seriously injuring his knee in the process.

It was ugly and it ended Santana’s season. At the time, many wondered if it was going to threaten his promising career.

We also remember that Santana held tight to the baseball through the play, resulting in an extremely painful out. Now, consider this: under the new experimental rule unveiled by Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association on Monday, Kalish would likely be deemed safe.

Santana was blocking the plate without the ball in hand (the frame by frame of that Aug. 2, 2010 play is in the image to left). Blocking without the baseball was always frowned upon, but now it’s officially illegal.

“What I was thinking after my accident, I’m not blocking when I don’t have the ball,” Santana said. “I’m blocking when I have the ball. This is what happened in my accident. I tried to block before I had the ball.”

Without the ball in hand, catchers must now keep part of the plate open for a runner. Cleveland catcher Yan Gomes said that has always been his style anyways. Gomes said he wants to have the runner in a “slide first” mentality, with the goal of taking away the plate at the final second.

Gomes, like all the catchers I spoke with on Monday, were in favor of the MLB’s ruling, especially since it has language that admits that some collisions are invitable. If a throw creates a reactionary play that puts a runner and catcher on a collision course, as long as the runner is not deemed to have intent to collide, it’s fair game.

Here are the details of the experimental Rule 7.13:

A runner attempting to score may not deviate from his direct pathway to the plate in order to initiate contact with the catcher (or other player covering home plate). If, in the judgment of the umpire, a runner attempting to score initiates contact with the catcher (or other player covering home plate) in such a manner, the umpire shall declare the runner out (even if the player covering home plate loses possession of the ball). In such circumstances, the umpire shall call the ball dead, and all other baserunners shall return to the last base touched at the time of the collision.

Rule 7.13 comment: The failure by the runner to make an effort to touch the plate, the runner’s lowering of the shoulder, or the runner’s pushing through with his hands, elbows or arms, would support a determination that the runner deviated from the pathway in order to initiate contact with the catcher in violation of Rule 7.13. If the runner slides into the plate in an appropriate manner, he shall not be adjudged to have violated Rule 7.13. A slide shall be deemed appropriate, in the case of a feet first slide, if the runner’s buttocks and legs should hit the ground before contact with the catcher. In the case of a head first slide, a runner shall be deemed to have slid appropriately if his body should hit the ground before contact with the catcher.

Unless the catcher is in possession of the ball, the catcher cannot block the pathway of the runner as he is attempting to score. If, in the judgment of the umpire, the catcher without possession of the ball blocks the pathway of the runner, the umpire shall call or signal the runner safe. Notwithstanding the above, it shall not be considered a violation of this Rule 7.13 if the catcher blocks the pathway of the runner in order to field a throw, and the umpire determines that the catcher could not have fielded the ball without blocking the pathway of the runner and that contact with the runner was unavoidable.

To read more about the rule, and Cleveland’s reaction to it, read my story on Indians.com.

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Photos from the past couple days

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Catch up on camp with these links:

Stay tuned for more…

–JB

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